Chendy (me_unabridged) wrote in book_group_2007,
Chendy
me_unabridged
book_group_2007

  • Location:
  • Mood:

The first vote part a

Hello one and all,

Okay, welcome to the first book list.  As this is the first one, I haven’t made it a particular genre, I thought it might be fun to have a total mix and see what we get.  The idea is, below is a list of ten books.  You comment with your top three that you’d want to read most (screened to keep it a surprise.)  Once everyone has voted, I work out the top three which is the shortlist.  Then, we vote out of the three for the one we are going to read.  After that has been decided, we arrange together on a suitable time limit and get on with the reading :D

 If you have any questions, don’t be afraid to ask.  If not, go and vote :D

 

The Top Ten

1. The Notebook – by Nicholas Sparks     

Review:  Set amid the austere beauty of the North Carolina coast, The Notebook begins with the story of Noah Calhoun, a rural Southerner recently returned form the Second World War. Noah is restoring a plantation home to its former glory, and he is haunted by images of the beautiful girl he met fourteen years earlier, a girl he loved like no other. Unable to find her, yet unwilling to forget the summer they spent together, Noah is content to live with only memories...until she unexpectedly returns to his town to see him once again. Like a puzzle within a puzzle, the story of Noah and Allie is just the beginning. As it unfolds, their tale miraculously becomes something different, with much higher stakes. The result is a deeply moving portrait of love itself, the tender moments and the fundamental changes that affect us all. It is a story of miracles and emotions that will stay with you forever.


2. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte

Review: In a house haunted by memories, the past is everywhere. As darkness falls, a man caught in a snowstorm is forced to shelter at the strange, grim house Wuthering heights. It is a place he will never forget. There he will come to learn the story of Cathy: how she was forced to choose between her well-meaning husband and the dangerous man she had loved since she was young. How her choice led to betrayal and terrible revenge and continues to torment those in the present. How love can transgress authority, convention, even death. And how desire can kill.

3. Little Women – Louisa M Alcott

Review: When Christmas comes for the four March girls, there is no money for expensive presents and they give away their Christmas breakfast to a poor family. But there are no happier girls in America than Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy. They miss their father, of course, who is away at the Civil War, but they try hard to be good so that he will be proud of his 'little women' when he comes home. This heart-warming story of family life has been popular for more than a hundred years.


4. Peter Pan – J.M.Barrie

Review: It was Friday night. Mr and Mrs Darling were dining out. Nana had been tied up in the backyard. The poor dog was barking, for she could smell danger. And she was right - this was the night that Peter Pan would take the Darling children on the most breath-taking adventure of their lives, to a place called Neverland, a strange country where the lost boys live and never grow up, a land with mermaids, fairies and pirates - and of course the terrible, evil, Captain Hook. Peter Pan is undoubtedly one of the most famous and best-loved stories for children, an unforgettable, magical fantasy which has been enjoyed by generations.


5. Small Island – Andrea Levy

Review: It is 1948, and England is recovering from a war. But at 21 Nevern Street, London, the conflict has only just begun. Queenie Bligh's neighbours do not approve when she agrees to take in Jamaican lodgers, but Queenie doesn't know when her husband will return, or if he will come back at all. What else can she do? Gilbert Joseph was one of the several thousand Jamaican men who joined the RAF to fight against Hitler. Returning to England as a civilian he finds himself treated very differently. It's desperation that makes him remember a wartime friendship with Queenie and knock at her door. Gilbert's wife Hortense, too, had longed to leave Jamaica and start a better life in England. But when she joins him she is shocked to find London shabby, decrepit, and far from the golden city of her dreams. Even Gilbert is not the man she thought he was.


6. Lucky Man – the autobiography of Michael J Fox

Review: The remarkable memoir of film star Michael J. Fox and his first ten years living with Parkinson's Disease. Diagnosed in 1991, Michael eventually lost his balance, his grace, his spontaneity, and the ability to read the morning newspaper. Even so, he realizes that, in fact, he is a lucky man.


7. The Beach – Alex Garland

Review: Richard is drawn into a strange conversation in a hotel. He hears of a secret island Garden of Eden hidden in the scattered islands of a Thai marine park. Next morning, he finds a map pinned to his door and the man who put it there has slashed his wrists. The challenge is irresistible and he sets off on a perilous journey in search of Shangri-La.


8. Three Men in a Boat – Jerome K Jerome

Review: Martyrs to hypochondria and general seediness, J. and his friends George and Harris decide that a jaunt up the Thames would suit them to a T'. But when they set off, they can hardly predict the troubles that lie ahead with tow-ropes, unreliable weather-forecasts and tins of pineapple chunks not to mention the devastation left in the wake of J.'s small fox-terrier Montmorency. Three Men in a Boat was an instant success when it appeared in 1889, and, with its benign escapism, authorial discursions and wonderful evocation of the late-Victorian clerking classes', it hilariously captured the spirit of its age.


9. The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown

Review: Robert Langdon, Harvard Professor of symbology, receives an urgent late-night call while in Paris: the curator of the Louvre has been murdered. Alongside the body is a series of baffling ciphers. Langdon and a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, are stunned to find a trail that leads to the works of Da Vinci - and further. The curator, part of a secret society named the Priory of Sion, may have sacrificed his life to keep secret the location of a vastly important religious relic hidden for centuries. It appears that the clandestine Vatican-sanctioned Catholic sect Opus Dei has now made its move. Unless Landon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine code and quickly assemble the pieces of the puzzle, the Priory's secret - and a stunning historical truth - will be lost forever.


10. Round Ireland with a fridge – Tony Hawkes

Review: While in Ireland for an international song competition, comedian Tony Hawks was amazed to see a hitch-hiker trying to thumb a lift with a fridge. This seemed amazingly optimistic - his Irish friends, however, thought nothing of it at all.  "I had clearly arrived in a country", writes Tony, "where the qualification for 'eccentric' involved a great deal more than that to which I had become used".  Years later, during an alcohol-fuelled evening, he found himself arguing about Ireland with a friend. It is, he insisted, a "magical place", so magical in fact, that a man could even get a lift with a fridge. The next morning there was a note by his bed. "I hereby bet Tony Hawks the sum of One Hundred Pounds that he cannot hitch hike around the circumference of Ireland with a fridge within one calendar month." The document was signed. The bet was made.This book is the story of Tony's adventures throughout that month, the people he meets, the difficulties he encounters and the triumphs.

*Reviews ripped from Amazon and Play.com

Tags: part a, vote one
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

  • 0 comments